Tweaks

Registry Tweaks: Please make sure to backup the Registry before editing any registry keys or values so that in case if any issues arise you can always revert back to original state.
You can follow the tips to import changes to the registry editor or if you are an expert then it is advisable to change it manually.

Below are some registry tweaks which can be useful to many, I have taken some time out to add few of them and as the days will pass the list will grow. 

Trick No. 1: To Show Windows classic folders (File | Edit | View | Tools | Help)
Copy the below highlighted text to natepad and save it as Classic.reg, once saved, double click on the file to import it into the registry editor. Restart the machine for changes.

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\Advanced]
"AlwaysShowMenus"=dword:00000001

Trick No. 2: How to Unlock TaskBar

Copy the below highlighted text to natepad and save it as Unlock.reg, once saved, double click on the file to import it into the registry editor. Restart the machine for changes.

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\Advanced]
"TaskbarSizeMove"=dword:00000001

Trick No. 3 : How to Show File Extensions

Copy the below highlighted text to natepad and save it as Extension.reg, once saved, double click on the file to import it into the registry editor. Restart the machine for changes.

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00
[HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\Advanced]
"HideFileExt"=dword:00000000



Trick No. 4 : How to Show detailed Device settings in device manager

Copy the below highlighted text to natepad and save it as Detail.reg, once saved, double click on the file to import it into the registry editor. Restart the machine for changes.

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00
[HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\ControlPanel]
"AllItemsIconView"=dword:00000001
"StartupPage"=dword:00000001

Trick No. 5 : How to enable Auto Play / Auto Run of CDs and DVDs

Windows 7 use to Auto Play / Auto Run when I bought it but suddenly it has been stopped and I need to manually run the CDs and DVDs. Try the step below.

Make sure you backup the registry and then proceed with the below steps.

Open regedit.exe (Click Start and type Regedit) and remove "NoDriveTypeAutoRun" key from:
1)HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\Curr entVersion\Policie s\Explorer
2)HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\Curre ntVersion\Policie s\Explorer

Trick No. 6 : Network adapters missing on Windows 7 Machine  

Windows 7 client machine. After a reboot, the Network and Sharing Center->Network Connections folder was empty. The icons for the network adapters (NIC) were missing. The reboot incurred a chkdsk which had found some registry corruption. 

Make sure you backup the registry and then proceed with the below steps.

Resolution :-
Under the registry key:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\ControlSet001\Control\Network\{4D36E972-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}\{759F6019-7C4A-44BD-A9EC-7DC5393874C3}\Connection

Make sure the below mentioned values are not missing. If they are missing please add them:

Valuename: "Name"
Type: REG_SZ
Creat it with a value of "Local Area Connection"
Valuename: "DefaultNameIndex"
Type: REG_DWORD
Creat it with a value of "0". Refereced a working machine for this value.
Mostly additional adapters would increment this number.
Valuename: "DefaultNameResourceId"
Type: REG_DWORD
Creat it with a value of "0x70b".

Trick No. 7 : Locking in delete confirmations

When you delete a file or folder in Windows 7, the system asks you to confirm the deletion. If this extra step bugs you, you can turn it off by right-clicking the desktop’s Recycle Bin icon, clicking Properties, and then deactivating the Display Delete Confirmation Dialog check box.
Now let’s consider this from the opposite point of view. The reason Windows displays the delete confirmation dialog box by default is to prevent you from accidentally deleting a file. You and I are savvy, knowledgeable users, so we know when we want to delete something, but not everyone falls into this boat. If you have young kids or old parents who use Windows, you know that the delete confirmation dialog box is an excellent safeguard for these and other inexperienced users.
In that case, you might be wondering if there’s a way to ensure that a novice user can’t turn off the delete confirmation dialog box. Yes, there is. In fact, are two ways to prevent a user from turning off delete confirmations:
  • Disable the Display Delete Confirmation Dialog check box that appears in the Recycle Bin’s property sheet.
  • Disable the Recycle Bin’s Properties command so that the user can’t display the Recycle Bin’s property sheet.
Follow these steps to implement one of these policies:
  1. In the Local Group Policy Editor, open the User Configuration branch.
  2. Open the Administrative Templates branch.
  3. Display the property sheet of the policy you want to use, as follows:
  • If you want to disable the Display Delete Confirmation Dialog check box, open the Windows Components branch and then click Windows Explorer. Double-click the policy named Display Confirmation Dialog When Deleting Files. If you don’t have access to the Group Policy Editor, open the Registry Editor and create a DWORD setting named ConfirmFileDelete with the value 1 in the following key:
HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\Explorer
  • If you want to disable the Recycle Bin’s Properties command, click Desktop and then double-click the Remove Properties From The Recycle Bin Context Menu policy. If you don’t have access to the Group Policy Editor, open the Registry Editor and create a DWORD setting named NoPropertiesRecycleBin with the value 1 in the following key:
HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\Explorer
  1. Click the Enabled option.
  2. Click OK to put the policy into effect.
Trick No. 8 :Disabling the notification area

If you have zero use for the taskbar’s notification area, you can disable it entirely by following these steps:
  1. In the Local Group Policy Editor, open the User Configuration branch.
  2. Open the Administrative Templates branch.
  3. Click the Start Menu And Taskbar branch.
  4. Double-click the Hide The Notification Area policy, click Enabled, and then click OK.
  5. Double-click the Remove Clock From The System Notification Area policy, click Enabled, and then click OK.
  6. Log off and then log back on to put the policy into effect.
If you prefer (or need) to implement this policy via the Registry, first open the Registry Editor (click Start, type regedit, press Enter, and enter your UAC credentials). Then, navigate to the following key:

HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\Explorer

(If you don’t see the Explorer key, click the Policies key, select Edit | New | Key, type Explorer, and press Enter.)
Now follow these steps:
  1. Select Edit | New | DWORD (32-bit) Value.
  2. Type NoTrayItemsDisplay and press Enter.
  3. Press Enter to open the NoTrayItemsDisplay setting, type 1, and then click OK.
  4. Select Edit | New | DWORD (32-bit) Value.
  5. Type HideClock and press Enter.
  6. Press Enter to open the HideClock setting, type 1, and then click OK.
  7. Log off and then log back on to put the policies into effect.
Trick No. 9 : Removing an icon from Control Panel

You can gain a bit more control over the Control Panel by configuring it not to display icons that you don’t ever use or that aren’t applicable to your system.
  1. In the Local Group Policy Editor, select the User Configuration | Administrative Templates | Control Panel branch.
  2. Double-click the Hide Specified Control Panel Items policy.
  3. Click the Enabled option.
  4. Click the Show button to open the Show Contents dialog box.
  5. For each Control Panel icon you want to hide, type the icon name and press Enter.
  6. Click OK to return to the Hide Specified Control Panel Items dialog box.
  7. Click OK. Windows 7 puts the policy into effect.
To perform the same tweak in the Registry, open the following key:

HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\Explorer

Add a DWORD value named DisallowCpl and set it equal to 1. Also create a new key named DisallowCpl, and within that key create a new String value for each Control Panel icon you want to disable. Give the settings the names 1, 2, 3, and so on, and for each one set the value to the name of the Control Panel icon you want to disable.

Trick no. 10 :Showing only specified Control Panel icons

Disabling a few Control Panel icons is useful because it reduces a bit of the clutter in the All Control Panel Items window. However, what if you want to set up a computer for a novice user and you’d like that person to have access to just a few relatively harmless icons, such as Personalization and Getting Started? In that case, it’s way too much work to disable most of the icons one at a time. A much easier approach is to specify just those few Control Panel icons you want the user to see. Here’s how:
  1. In the Local Group Policy Editor, select the User Configuration | Administrative Templates | Control Panel branch.
  2. Double-click the Show Only Specified Control Panel Items policy.
  3. Click the Enabled Option.
  4. Click the Show button to open the Show Contents dialog box.
  5. For each Control Panel icon you want to show, type the icon name and press Enter.
  6. Click OK to return to the Show Only Specified Control Panel Items dialog box.
  7. Click OK. Windows 7 puts the policy into effect.
To perform the same tweak in the Registry, open the following key:

HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\Explorer
 
Add a DWORD value named RestrictCpl and set it equal to 1. Also create a new key named RestrictCpl, and within that key create a new String value for each Control Panel icon you want to show. Give the settings the names 1, 2, 3, and so on, and for each one set the value to the name of the Control Panel icon you want to show.

Trick no. 11 : Preventing other folks from messing with the Registry

Do you share your computer with other people? How brave! In that case, there’s a pretty good chance that you don’t want them to have access to the Registry Editor. In Windows 7, User Account Control automatically blocks Standard users unless they know an administrator’s password. For other administrators, you can prevent any user from using the Registry Editor by setting a group policy:
  1. In the Local Group Policy Editor, open the User Configuration | Administrative Templates | System branch.
  2. Double-click the Prevent Access To Registry Editing Tools policy.
  3. Click Enabled.
  4. In the Disable Regedit From Running Silently? list, click Yes.
  5. Click OK.
Once you set this policy, you won’t be able to use the Registry Editor, either. However, you can overcome that by temporarily disabling the policy prior to running the Registry Editor.
Yes, you could perform this tweak in Windows 7 Home and Home Premium using the Registry Editor, but then you wouldn’t be able to reverse it because the Registry Editor would be disabled!

Trick no. 12 : Disabling Internet Explorer’s Security and Privacy tabs

If you want to prevent a novice user from mucking around in Security and Privacy tabs in the Internet Options dialog box, you can hide them:
  1. In the Local Group Policy Editor, select the User Configuration | Administrative Templates | Windows Components | Internet Explorer | Internet Control Panel branch.
  2. Double-click the Disable The Privacy Page policy.
  3. Click Enabled and then click OK.
  4. Double-click the Disable The Security Page policy.
  5. Click Enabled and then click OK.
Note that the Security Page sub-branch also enables you to set policies for the settings in each zone.
To configure these policies via the Registry Editor, first display the following branch:

HKCU\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\Control Panel
 
Add a DWORD setting named PrivacyTab and set it to 1; add another DWORD setting named SecurityTab and set it to 1.